CHI2014 write(sketch)-up

I recently attended CHI2014 to deliver a work-in-progress and 2 workshop papers and like most attendees I decided to blog my experiences. However unlike most I’ve opted to take a similar approach as my CHI2013 write up creating a digital sketchnote travelogue that expresses my key experiences & feelings:

Digital CHI2014 Sketchnote Travelogue

I’ve also collated my sketchnotes from the eleven CHI2014 sessions I attended, these range from UX, accessibility, tactile experiences and empathy design.

CHI2014 Sketchnote

CHI2014 Sketchnote

CHI2014 Sketchnote

CHI2014 Sketchnote

CHI2014 Sketchnote

CHI2014 Sketchnote

CHI2014 Sketchnote Ways Of Creating in HCI

CHI2014 Sketchnote

CHI2014 Sketchnote

CHI2014 Sketchnote

CHI2014 Sketchnote

CHI2014 Sketchnote

CHI2014 travelogue & session sketchnotes can also be found on Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/makaylalewis/sets/72157644383668723/

©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

These photographs are presented here for viewing purposes ONLY. They are NOT royalty free images and may not be used for commercial or private use. Any such use of these images is strictly prohibited. Specifically, these images may not be copied, manipulated, be reproduced by any other means nor sold without prior written consent by the author.

Sketchnotes: UXPA-UK Global Accessibility Awareness Day

Accessibility is an essential part of good design and user experience. It is important for UX practitioners like us to recognise that people access products and services with diverse abilities, needs and context. May 9th marks the Global Accessibility Awareness Day (GAAD) and the UXPA UK is proud to participate in this global initiative; bringing accessibility closer to the UX practice. Source: UXPA-UK

How to move beyond the touch screen for a better accessibility of mobile and tablet native applications, by  Fabien Marry

Abstract: For many with different abilities, using a smartphone or a tablet through their touch screen can be difficult. We will see why and how to make your native apps more accessible. We’ll start with pitfalls to avoid and simple steps with great results. Then we’ll see how to tap into the powerful built-in accessibility systems that allow you to make your app usable by wheelchair controls or that turn your graphical user interface into an auditory user interface. Source: UXPA-UK

Sketchnotes from UXPA Global Accessibility Awareness Day, 2013

BBC Olympics: An accessibility case study, by Alistair Duggin

Abstract: How do you make a website as ambitious as the BBC Olympics accessible? This presentation shares the challenges faced, approaches used and lessons learned. Source: UXPA-UK

Sketchnotes from UXPA Global Accessibility Awareness Day, 2013

Inspiring Diverse UX Panel, facilitated by Veronika Jermolina involving Andre Louis and Abdi Gas

Abstract: When you meet someone who experiences the world differently, the way you design products and services changes forever. We would like to introduce to you the people who’ve inspired us with their stories, challenges and techniques they have adopted to navigate designs which have not taken their needs into consideration. How does someone experience the world when they can’t see, can’t hear or rely on other assistive technologies? Source: UXPA-UK

Sketchnotes from UXPA-UK GAAD event panel

Sketchnotes from this event can also be found on Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/makaylalewis/sets/72157633462127160/with/8724809089/

More information on the GAAD event can be found at http://uxpa-uk-may2013-eorg.eventbrite.com/

©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

These photographs are presented here for viewing purposes ONLY. They are NOT royalty free images and may not be used for commercial or private use. Any such use of these images is strictly prohibited. Specifically, these images may not be copied, manipulated, be reproduced by any other means nor sold without prior written consent by the author.

CHI2013 write(sketch)-up

I recently attended CHI2013 (SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems) and like a lot of attendees I decided to blog my experiences. I originally began a rather lengthy write-up that discussed the informative sessions I attended, the influential individuals I met and the key things I learnt. I was half-way through and said to myself:

“Makayla you’ve been sharing your sketchnotes throughout the conference why are you now writing?”

I deleted the post, closed my laptop, opened my Moleskine, grabbed 3 pens and sketched a highlight travelogue that expressed all my key experiences & feelings plus much more.  So here is my “sketch-up” for CHI2013:

Sketchnote Travelogue: CHI2013, Paris France
Sketchnote Travelogue for CHI2013

I have also collated my sketchnotes from the twelve CHI2013 sessions I attended, these range from UX, accessibility, co-design to information security:

My CHI2013 travelogue & session sketchnotes can also be found on Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/makaylalewis/sets/72157633362234865/detail/

©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

These photographs are presented here for viewing purposes ONLY. They are NOT royalty free images and may not be used for commercial or private use. Any such use of these images is strictly prohibited. Specifically, these images may not be copied, manipulated, be reproduced by any other means nor sold without prior written consent by the author.

Making events accessible web resource by Scie

Access is the same for non-disabled people as disabled people. You wouldn’t hold a meeting on the 10th floor with no lifts, or where there was nowhere to sit, or in pitch blackness or even where all documents were given out in Braille.

Last year I consulted on a Social Care Institute for Excellence (Scie) web resource project. I predominately looked at the usability of the access-wiki website however my personal/research experience of accessibility was also put forward. As a result of this and other work [1] Scie have recently launched a Making events accessible web resource (it is no longer referred to as a wiki) . The aim of the web resource is to help people plan events and meetings within the social care field that are accessible to people who use services. However I feel the findings presented within the web resource should be considered by all event organisers. The Making events accessible resource can be found here: http://www.scie.org.uk/publications/accessibleevents/index.asp
Screenshot of Making Events Accessible: Choosing a Venue webpage
Screenshot of Making Events Accessible: Choosing a Venue webpage - http://www.scie.org.uk/publications/accessibleevents/choosingavenue/index.asp

[1] This resource was written by Fran Branfield from the suggestions and comments made by people who use services on SCIE’s access-wiki website. The web access-wiki was usability and accessibility tested by consultants which in turn affected the delivery of the final resource.

#csun12 Twitter statistics and content analysis by @maccymacx

Chart showing #csun12 hashtag between 27/02-03/03/2012Over the next couple of days I plan to upload Twitter statistics and content analysis for 27th Annual International Technology and Persons with Disabilities Conference (CSUN’12). To do this I will be using #csun12 hashtag from Monday 27th February to Saturday 3rd March 2012.

— Data correct as of 03/02/2012 at 08:39PST.

Total tweets:

4,880 including retweets and @ mentions (see graph on right)

Associated hashtags

#csun12, #a11y, #perfecta11y, #wacol, #accessibility, #a11ysociety, #accessgrade, #gerijewell, #etext,

#bs8878, #ipad, #newblack, #w3c, #blind, #csun2012, #socialmedia, #ibm, #html5, #tweetup, #accessibilité,

#ixd, #619, #mobile, #windows, #techcomm, #ios, #braille, #bsi, #road2csun, #aac, #apps, #adobe, #web,

#html5a11y, #accessu, #autism, #kinect, #twitter, #aria, #webable, #twitpix, #video, #awesome, #axs,

#inclusivetlc, #assistivetechnology, #sandiego, #media, #disabilities, #tobii, #ipad2, #slpeeps, #disability,

#android, #tapit, #csun13, #spedchat, #wcag, #windows8, #moodle, #longdesc, #oi_vote, #blindness,

#description, #epub, #microsoft, #newtwitter, #ipad3, #205, #accessiweb, #seo, #html, #csunsocial,

#csuntweetup, #deaf, #webdev, #edtechbc, #technology, #win8, #usability, #a11yla, #pdf, #aphasia,

#apraxia, #assistive, #ally, #windoweyes, #road2csun, #olderixd, #cost, #eowg, #petition

Tweet Locations:

  • USA
  • Canada
  • France
  • UK
  • Germany

Key communities tweeting:

  • Technology
  • Bloggers
  • Students
  • Engineers
  • News
  • Politics

Sentiment analysis

  • 25% positive sentiments
  • 1% negative sentiments
  • 74% neutral sentiments

Gender

  • 82% male
  • 18% female

Top 3 Retweets

  1. RT @maccymacx: WCAG 2.0 success criteria: keyboard accessible Facebook 14%, LinkedIn 29%, Youtube 0%, Google Plus 0% and Twitter 0%. #CSUN12
  2. RT @SeroTalk: All of the @serotalk Podcast interviews from #csun12 are now available on SPN Radio available from the front page of iBlin …
  3. RT @gwmicro: #CSUN12 Window-Eyes and Windows 8 Presentation now available online:http://t.co/DgRqeINo

Top 10 tweeters:

  1. @maccymacx
  2. @yahooaccess
  3. @jennison
  4. @dboudreau
  5. @goodwitch
  6. @webaxe
  7. @slewth
  8. @mpaciello
  9. @karlgroves
  10. @blindbargains

Other twitter users include:

@leoniewatson @pauljadam @iheni @joedolson @scenariogirl @a11ymedia @whitneyq @ppatel @serotalk

@jared_w_smith @aseanidpp @graceapp @a11yconf @oliviernourry @mike107designs @lflegal @wahlbin

@stcaccess @nethermind @gba11yday @dennisl @canadian_diva @easychirp @csuncod @wendyabc

@johnfoliot @terrillthompson @stevefaulkner @pyyhkala @googleaccess @vick08 @gwmicro @charjtf

@dbo75 @clydewii @accesssandiego @uxprinciples @hanshillen @sinabahram @mongoose_q @msftenable

@kelsmith @christiane @mactoph @ladymoonan @chadleaman @samuelsirois @looktel @ibmaccess

@gbla11yday @mikecalvo @jesse_a11y @mediaaccessaus @lordjeff @accessforall @webaim

@marcoinenglish @salesforce @kmactane @audaciouslife @martinlittler @arigaud_pro @accessibledaisy

@jfc3 @mollydotcom @robert_sinclair @hkramer99 @dequesystems @knowbility @feather @senderogps

@ricky_enger @berkeleyblink @web @marcozehe @leonie_watson @vincent45nord @paciellogroup

@pooja_nahata @kevinchao89 @lisamareedom @jage9 @cptvitamin @jonhassell @sallycain @nfb_voice

@swimsy @mattmay @sonnentuete

Analysis of final day of conference (2/03/2012)

Tweets:

  • 998 tweets generated
  • 480 original tweets
  • 81 @ mentions
  • 437 retweets
  • 861,444 impressions reaching an audience of 258,898 followers

Top 3 by number of impressions:

  1. @maccymacx: 57.460
  2. @mpaciello: 41,580
  3. @cindyii: 41,447

Top 10 by number of tweets in last 24hrs:

  1. @maccymacx: 68
  2. @slewth: 47
  3. @kmactane: 31

5-stage process for social media change at #CSUN12

Interview Participant Using Social Media and Assistive Technology
Interview/observation participant using social media and assistive technology

Short Title: aOSN-cp model to assist social media change

Strap line: An aOSN-cp model to support online social network users with cerebral palsy when providers introduce change.

Conference: 27th Annual International Technology and Persons with Disabilities Conference (CSUN’12)

Type: Lecture | Session Length: 60 minutes

Date/Time: Friday, March 2, 2012 – 4:20 PM PST

Location: Madeleine CD, 3rd Floor

Session webpage: http://bit.ly/MakaylaLewis-CSUN12

Internet use in the United Kingdom is almost the highest in Europe, with over 65% of households accessing the Internet […]. Forty-nine percent of these users are using online social networks (OSNs) like Facebook, Twitter, Bebo and YouTube and are now making over 24 million visits a month [1, 2, 3]. Nevertheless, OSNs are often directed at people without disabilities. Existing human-computer interaction (HCI) literature suggests that OSNs have the potential to help people with cerebral palsy (cp) to overcome their mobility, access and communication limitations to enable communication independence [4, 5]. As conventional communication methods like face-to-face communication, telephone communication and text message communication are often difficult to use and can limit the opportunities for these users to engage in successful socialization […]. Therefore people with cp often see online communication especially OSNs as an attractive alternative [5, 6]. In spite of this, there have been no studies that solely look at OSN experiences and challenges faced among users with cp. The goal of this research was to address this gap in the research to make this community visible.

An exploratory interview study was carried out. The study explored the experiences and challenges faced when users with cerebral palsy use OSNs. Fourteen semi-structured interviews were carried out consisting of participants with different types of cp. The study found, among other factors, that abrupt and frequently changing online social networks slowed down and or prevented use [4]. For example during September 2011 Facebook.com introduced three functional changes that included a revamped friend lists, real-time news ticker and a subscribe button. Subsequently during the following month further changes that included a major overhaul of user profiles, new applications for playing music and watching videos were deployed. Such changes often affect assistive technology resulting in users relearning the number of clicks when using switches, making interacting with OSNs time-consuming. In spite of this, the study also identified that the technology is a vital way for users with cp to communicate with friends and family and would continue to play a key role within their lives.

To further explore the affects of abrupt and frequent changing OSNs a longitudinal web 2.0 monitoring and analysis study was carried out. The study identified how OSN Twitter.com changes, specially # Old Twitter to # New Twitter, are introduced, their affect on users, and the factors that encourage change acceptance and non-acceptance. More than 950,000 tweets mentioning #(hashtag) New Twitter were posted between September 2010 to February 2011, however the 60-minute lecturer will focus on 600 tweets from key discrete occasions: peaks. The results of the study were used alongside common change management approaches and theories to develop an innovative 5-stage process for online social network change (aOSNcp) for OSN change agents to follow. The process defines the requirements for successful online social network change including the OSN change agent responsibilities before, during and after the change.

The lecture will summarize the exploratory interview study; introduce the key inhibiting factor and the examination of New Twitter; and present the aOSN-cp process as a method to assist online social network providers during user interface change process without alienating users with cp. A video of Makayla’s lightning talk “Developing a 5-stage process for online social network change: a focus on users with cerebral palsy” at January’s Web Accessibility London meetup has been made available to summarize this lecture.

[vimeo http://vimeo.com/37237102]

References

[1] eNation reports – Social networking sites lock out disabled users – AbilityNet. Available: http://www.abilitynet.org.uk/enation85 [1/28/2011, 2011].

[2] DUTTON, W.H., HELSPER, E.J. and GERBER, M.M., 2009. The internet in Britain: 2009. Oxford Internet Institute.

[3] OFFICE FOR NATIONAL STATISTICS, 2009. Internet Access 2008 Households and Individuals. Office for National Statistics.

[4] LEWIS, M., 2010. Cerebral palsy and online social networks, Proceedings of the 12th international ACM SIGACCESS conference on Computers and accessibility, 2010, ACM, pp. 243-244.

[5] BALLIN, L. and BALANDIN, S., 2007. An exploration of loneliness: Communication and the social networks of older people with cerebral palsy. Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 32(4), pp. 315-326.

[6] DOBRANSKY, K. and HARGITTAI, E., 2006. The disability divide in Internet access and use. Information, Communication & Society, 9(3), pp. 313-334.

[7] THOMAS, D.R., 2006. A general inductive approach for analyzing qualitative evaluation data. American Journal of Evaluation, 27(2), pp. 237.